« March 11, 2007 - March 17, 2007 | Main | March 25, 2007 - March 31, 2007 »

March 24, 2007

Collapsing Colonies: Are GM Crops Killing Bees? - International - SPIEGEL ONLINE - News

Are genetically modified crops killing bees? --- SNIP: According to Hans-Hinrich Kaatz, a professor at the University of Halle in eastern Germany and the director of the study, the bacterial toxin in the genetically modified corn may have "altered the surface of the bee's intestines, sufficiently weakening the bees to allow the parasites to gain entry -- or perhaps it was the other way around. We don't know."

Collapsing Colonies: Are GM Crops Killing Bees? - International - SPIEGEL ONLINE - News

Are genetically modified crops killing bees? --- SNIP: According to Hans-Hinrich Kaatz, a professor at the University of Halle in eastern Germany and the director of the study, the bacterial toxin in the genetically modified corn may have "altered the surface of the bee's intestines, sufficiently weakening the bees to allow the parasites to gain entry -- or perhaps it was the other way around. We don't know."

March 23, 2007

MyOneLineOfCodeBrowser

Leica otaku bliss

Comment from Alaina Browne on 2007-03-23

It's actually the prix fixe dinner at Del Posto Enoteca and it's $41 according to the website, and an additional $19 for the wine pairings. I haven't been yet, but I understand it's very delicious (I'm sure Ed will chime in to confirm). The Amateur Gourmet posted about his recent visit.

Affordability and Eating Local

One of the challenges of eating local aside from seasonality and geography is cost. In his interview with Anne E. McBride on Leite's Culinaria Michael Pollan, author of The Omnivore's Dilemma, reiterates a point he makes in the book:
"There is definitely a class issue here. To do the right thing, when it comes to food choices, takes more money, there's no question about that. It's one of the biggest problems we face. But there are a lot of Americans — more than half, I would say — who have the wherewithal to spend a little bit more money on better food choices. I think, in a large part — certainly for my audience, probably for your audience —, it's a matter of priority rather than affordability. . ."
Our friends at Eat Local Challenge are putting this to the test with the Penny-Wise Eat Local Challenge, to find out if it's possible to eat locally within an average American family food budget, without going through the exercise of a household budget's re-prioritization. Those choosing to participate in the challenge taking place April 23-29 will be attempting to stick to budgets based on statistics from the Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistic. I won't be participating this time around, but I'll certainly be following along to see how the participants fare.

John Jay Forensic Psychology, here I come!!

What you missed during the Gonzales debacle | FP Passport

It's been all Gone-zales, all the time this week in Washington, not to mention the four-year anniversary of the start of the Iraq war. So what else happened around the world this week that wasn't included in 3,000 pages of Justice Department emails? A humble round-up:

Oodles of Google Video Documentaries

Last week, we talked about how it can be logistically difficult to find smart videos on Google Video and YouTube. Then, this week, we stumble upon this: a no-frills web site called Best Online Documentaries that aggregates, yes, you guessed it, high-quality online documentaries, almost all from Google Video. The video segments are divided into broad categories (Biographies, History, Religion, Science, etc), and, within them, you'll find some items that deserve your time -- including a history of Byzantium, a biography of Malcolm X, a look at Alfred Hitchcock and his films, a program called The God Delusion featuring the Oxford scientist Richard Dawkins, and, at the other end of the spectrum, a counterpoint British program, The Trouble with Atheism. If these programs are up your alley, you can start perusing the larger collection here

Josh Wolf wins award; would probably prefer his fredom after 214 days in jail

tn_freejoshwolf.jpg 

(Freelance journalist and anarchist Josh Wolf has refused to turn over videotapes of a protest being investigated by a federal grand jury. Online Journalism Review has written about his case; you can read more in Wikipedia. In December I promised to write about his case every Friday until he is freed. Spread the word. – Tom Abate aka MiniMediaGuy).

American Journalism Review has published a lovely portrait of Josh Wolf and his mother, Liz Wol Spada, who is described as “an elementary school teacher with cropped gray hair who speaks in the earnest, optimistic tones of someone who spends a lot of time with young children.”

The AJR article, written by Dana Hull, a San Jose Mercury News reporter, concludes with a phone interview (prison officials would not allow a face to face visit):

“I’ve become more resolved in a few key points,” says Wolf . . .  ”I want to go to graduate school for journalism and get a better understanding of the history of journalism. And the issue of prison communication is very neglected within the entire justice system.” He’s embarked on a new project, PrisonBlogs.Net, which seeks to “provide prisoners with a voice, a public, and the sense of empowerment and the restored dignity this brings” by publishing their writing and art. Says Wolf: “I’ve got an exit plan.”

* * *

Meanwhile, Josh will receive the Newpaper Guild’s Herbert Block Freedom Award. It comes with a $5,000 prize. The Guild press release says:

“Wolf, a San Francisco freelance journalist . . . has been held in federal prison since August 2006 for refusing to turn over video he shot of a July 8, 2005, demonstration in San Francisco. Federal prosecutors looking into possible crimes committed during the protest called Wolf before a federal grand jury in February 2006. He was initially jailed in August, freed for a short period during an appeal and was returned to prison on Sept. 22, 2006, where he remains. His attorney has stated that the video Wolf shot does not depict the crimes being investigated, but does include interviews with some of the protestors who spoke on the condition that their identities would be protected. Wolf continues to appeal the ruling.” 

* * *

Hope continues that new U.S. Attorney Steve Schools will take a fresh look at Wolf’s case. If you have not already done so, write him. Keep a level tone. It’s hard for people to focus on your words when you’re hurling verbal insults. Here are the addresses:

By snail mail: The Honorable Scott Schools, United States Attorney’s Office for the Northern District of California, 450 Golden Gate Avenue, 11th Floor, San Francisco, California 94102-3495
By email, send it to his assistant: natalya.labauve@usdoj.gov and she will refer it.

 

Michael Pollan has some good advice for writing about nature...

Meet & Eat: Benjamin Trott

You might not know Ben Trott, but you're probably familiar with his work. Along with his wife, Mena, Ben created Movable Type, the blogging system that Serious Eats uses to bring you food info each day. As cofounder of Six Apart, Ben and his colleagues are also responsible for TypePad, Vox, and LiveJournal.

20070323trott.jpgName: Benjamin Trott
Location: San Francisco
Occupation: CTO/cofounder, Six Apart
URL: http://btrott.vox.com/

Favorite comfort food?
As it's winter now, we've been enjoying heartier stews, soups, etc.—things that make us warm. Just last weekend I made this beef stew with port and porcini, which was filling & fantastic, and since I made the full recipe, lasted us the better part of a week.

Guilty pleasures?
Ice cream, pretty much any flavor. I worked at Baskin Robbins for a year while in high school, and I had a free scoop of ice cream with every time I worked—but it wasn't nearly enough to put me off ice cream entirely. I like everything from the really simple stuff, like French vanilla, to the wonderful sticky toffee pudding, which basically has chunks of cake in it.

Describe your perfect meal.
Five years ago (omg, five years ago) Mena wrote a post about coming up with an ideal meal, if we could combine courses from a bunch of places we'd eaten. It's sort of funny to look at, because in those past five years, we've eaten so many new and incredible meals that aren't represented there, largely because of work or with people we've met through work—amazing sushi and tempura dinners in Japan at tiny little restaurants with just counter seating; an incredible French Laundry experience that left me unable to eat for a day both because I'd eaten so much and because it was just so good; a meal at Masa that was just so incredibly joyful in its simultaneous decadence (deep-fried truffle!) and simplicity. We're really lucky to have had eating experiences like that.

But for all of that, one of the best meals of recent memory came in a fairly inauspicious way. For a couple of wonderful months in 2005, there was a taco truck one block away from the Six Apart offices. We'd go there every day for lunch. At the beginning of 2006, it moved away to the financial district (too far to walk), and we've bemoaned its loss ever since.

One day, we went climbing in the Mission, and on the way home, we saw the taco truck (our taco truck!). We bought some carne asada tacos, brought them home, and had a perfect meal (so good that our dog, Maddy, wished she were human, so she could have some tacos, too).

Food you won't eat?
There aren't many. I'm not a big fan of mayonnaise; in fact, I never used to eat it at all. Story: A couple of months ago in Japan, I went out with a couple of friends and coworkers to dinner and ate crazy things like cow stomach. I loved it, which, I think, was a bit of a surprise to my friends. Imagine their surprise the next day, then, when I refused to eat the mayonnaise-corn-potato pizza they ordered. That's just going too far.

What food would you like to try?
It's not so much a food as a way of eating. One of the places I'd really love to travel to is Thailand, because I'd love to just wander around eating food from vendors on the street. Walk and snack, etc.

Favorite food person?
That's really tough. Anthony Bourdain was the first food person I actually started reading, and he got me interested in the food/chef world. Jeffrey Steingarten was next, and reading him actually made me start to think about enjoying food, as opposed to just eating it. As for a current favorite, probably Michael Ruhlman, as I'm currently catching up on all of his books, and am totally enthralled with the CIA drama in The Making of a Chef, or Michael Pollan, because I just can't get over how good The Omnivore's Dilemma was.

When did you realize you were a serious eater?
I actually don't really think of myself that way; I just think I like food and drink a lot. I also really enjoy cooking, both for other people and for myself, because it's a really therapeutic thing after a long day of working.

What do your friends and family think of your food obsession?
Mena and I have always really enjoyed food, and I think she's probably happy that I'm cooking all the time again, now. There was a fairly recent period of time—for a year or so—where we ate Jenny Craig food mostly exclusively. It started out as an exercise in weight loss, but quickly devolved into a painless, simple way to get food, until we both realized that what we were eating was not, in fact, food (although, for what it's worth, we did lose weight). That was when I started cooking again—I wanted to enjoy eating again, and to control what I was actually putting in my stomach.

elastic nobel prize lists

The Eco-Friendly 7.83Hz House

March 22, 2007

Front row seat for Al Gore congressional testimony: $850 | FP Passport

How professional line waiters snag the best spots for those willing to drop the dough.

Making Energy Costs Visible

(Or, Making Hidden Costs Visible, Continued…)

“Turn off those lights, you’re wasting energy!”

Growing up, I did it cause my dad told me to, and I do it now because I know in the back of my head that running the lights must be costing me. But it’s hard not to be apathetic about it: The costs of household energy consumption, both to my wallet and the environment, are far too invisible to affect immediate decision-making and behavior.

Lucid Design Group recognized that a once-a-month energy bill isn’t enough to change behavior and developed the “Building Dashboard,” a system with a widget-like interface that aims to “translate consumption into everyday units that a non-technical audience can understand — dollars, lightbulbs, carbon dioxide.”

“It is difficult to motivate building occupants to take actions that conserve resources if they cannot easily sense and react to the implications of their decisions.

Research demonstrates that easily accessible feedback on resource use increases both awareness and motivation to act in ways that change attitudes, minimize resource use and save money.

A Building Dashboard™ display provides uniquely interpretable graphics for a non-technical audience and creates opportunities for active learning through feedback that are not otherwise available.”

It’s a great concept. Unfortunately it’s not something that I, the building resident and consumer, could set up and use — it’s something that must be implemented by a green-minded architect or building manager.

Now if only there were more services like this that could make such information available and accessible to the masses. Perhaps the energy companies could provide such a service? What kind of infrastructure does it take to implement designs for widespread behavioral change?

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Chris Ware: This American Life

chris-ware-thisamericanlife.jpg

Chris Ware animates a segment from the new Showtime edition of This American Life. It’s the story of a class that becomes obsessed with video-taping everything everyone does… until, like Lord of the Flies, things go awry.

Thanks to Brenden, for the link.

On Translators: Edith Grossman

En un lugar de la Mancha, de cuyo nombre no quiero acordarme, no ha mucho tiempo que vivía un hidalgo de los de lanza en astillero, adarga antigua, rocín flaco y galgo corrredor.--Miguel de Cervantes

Somewhere in La Mancha, in a place whose name I do not care to remember, a gentleman lived not long ago, one of those who has a lance and ancient shield on a shelf and keeps a skinny nag and a greyhound for racing.--trans. Edith Grossman

Today's Writer's Almanac features a brief biography of the translator Edith Grossman (you'll need to scroll down for 5/22).  Grossman, you may recall, followed Gregory Rabassa as Gabriel García Márquez's primary English translator and in 2003 she published a new English translation of Don Quixote.   In a talk she gave at the Queen Sofía Spanish Institute in May 2005, Grossman related that once she rendered the first (and the most famous) line of DQ she was able to proceeded sentence by sentence, page by page.  She gave herself a break between Parts I and II and translated an erotic novel.  Here are a few quotes from that talk:

  • "Translators are expected to self-destruct as if they were personally responsible for the Tower of Babel."
  • "Living languages will not be regulated."
  • "Faithfulness has little do with literal meaning."
  • "Translators translate context."
  • "Somebody once asked (Gregory) Rabassa: 'Do you have enough Spanish to translate?' and he replied, 'The question is, Do I have enough English?'"  (SK: This is one of my favorite translation quotes!)
  • "Literary language may be a form of translation."  (SK: Octavio Paz makes this argument in a fine article on translation which Grossman referenced. Others have also made this claim.)
  • Quoting Flaubert: "Language is a cracked kettle."

An interview with Michael Pollan about The Omnivore's Dilemma. "Whereas...

The Latest with Subway Hero Wesley Autrey

The other day, we were listening to the radio and heard an ad with Wesley Autrey, the city's beloved subway hero! Autrey has done a series of public service announcements with the city's health department to encourage New Yorkers over 50 to get screened for colon cancer. From the DOH...

Best Birthday Present Ever [Flickr]

Stewart posted a photo:

Best Birthday Present Ever

A preserved squid in an illuminated rotating cannister. You can see this specimen in all 360 degrees! Oooh ... "specimen".

Prosecutor Says Bush Appointees Interfered With Tobacco Case - washingtonpost.com

Prosecutor Says Bush Appointees Interfered With Tobacco Case Sharon Y. Eubanks said Bush loyalists in Attorney General Alberto R. Gonzales's office began micromanaging the team's strategy in the final weeks of the 2005 trial, to the detriment of the government's claim that the industry had conspired to lie to U.S. smokers.

March 21, 2007

David Iglesias, one of the 8 federal prosecutors recently fired...

Fascinating clip from the This American Life TV show about...

Obama Rebuffs Soros - March 21, 2007 - The New York Sun

OBAMA REBUFFS SOROS. Leading Democrats, including Senator Obama of Illinois, are distancing themselves from an essay published this week by one of their party's leading financiers that called for the Democratic Party to "liberate" itself from the influence of the pro-Israel lobby. The article, by George Soros, published in the New York Review of Books, asserts that America should pressure Israel to negotiate with the Hamas-led unity government in the Palestinian territories regardless of whether Hamas recognizes the right of the Jewish state to exist. Mr. Soros goes on to say that one reason America has not embraced this policy is because of the influence of the American Israel Public Affairs Committee.

Obama Rebuffs Soros - March 21, 2007 - The New York Sun

OBAMA REBUFFS SOROS. Leading Democrats, including Senator Obama of Illinois, are distancing themselves from an essay published this week by one of their party's leading financiers that called for the Democratic Party to "liberate" itself from the influence of the pro-Israel lobby. The article, by George Soros, published in the New York Review of Books, asserts that America should pressure Israel to negotiate with the Hamas-led unity government in the Palestinian territories regardless of whether Hamas recognizes the right of the Jewish state to exist. Mr. Soros goes on to say that one reason America has not embraced this policy is because of the influence of the American Israel Public Affairs Committee.

The Shack is Back

Today is the first day of Spring and the official season opening of the Shake Shack. Things actually got going on Monday and we headed over for lunch. The line was reasonable and the burgers just as I remembered.

burger beauties first burgers of the season

the postgresql conf cheat sheet

love it

del.icio.us bookmark this on del.icio.us - posted by fruminator to - more about this bookmark...

Every Fire Escape in Soho

Every Fire Escape in Soho

We just discovered Greg Martin's wonderful drawings of Soho fire escapes. His site obsessively chronicles just about every one in the area bounded by Broadway, Houston, Canal, and West Broadway. A graduate of Columbia's MFA program, Martin also does a great polar bear. Good work!...

A-B Testing with Menu Items

Turbo Speedclock Oven

informative google themes

Solr

Solr is an open source enterprise search server based on the Lucene Java search library, with XML/HTTP and JSON APIs, hit highlighting, faceted search, caching, replication, and a web admin interface.

Rediscovered Maps at Brown University

iMac revision in the works; sky to remain blue for forseeable future

March 20, 2007

Bikes and Media at Intel

More interesting that the contrasting old v. young and laptop are the two bikes in the background of this poster for Intel’s Leap Ahead™ vision. The poster also caught my attention because next month I’ll blog from Beijing about bikes (of course), but also the pace of change in China. I had read that bikes still outnumber cars in China, but I’m expecting that’s rapidly changing.

intel_poster.jpg

RIP John Backus

John Backus was the guy who looked at machine code and punch cards and said, “There has to be a better way.” His solution was FORTRAN, which in the words of his New York Times obituary, “changed the terms of communication between humans and computers, moving up a level to a language that was more comprehensible by humans.” He also developed the notation for any programming language that helped in the development of compilers. Anyone who has ever written a line of code owes him their thanks and his family their condolences. He passed away on Saturday at age 82.

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Video: Chris Ware animation for Showtime's This American Life

? Twitter

The phrase "au contraire mon Frere-Jones" is just hanging out...

15 Minutes on Twittervision

I just spent 15 minutes watching Twittervision, more time than I could stand to spend on the public Twitter list. Maybe because it shows the breadth of the folks using Twitter around the world. Or maybe, darn it, it's because it's like TV...you can just watch the pictures go by...

Prince Govan? Not necessarily.

Perl one-liner for checking if a number is prime. (via...

Comment from megnut on 2007-03-20

12 minute walk = more calorie burn off walking to and fro = more burgers can be consumed!

Impeach Bush For Peace » Rep. Dennis Kucinich: "Is it time?" for Impeachment ANSWER HIM WITH A RESOUNDING "YES!"

Rep. Dennis Kucinich: "Is it time?" for Impeachment ANSWER HIM WITH A RESOUNDING "YES!"

Impeach Bush For Peace » Rep. Dennis Kucinich: "Is it time?" for Impeachment ANSWER HIM WITH A RESOUNDING "YES!"

Rep. Dennis Kucinich: "Is it time?" for Impeachment ANSWER HIM WITH A RESOUNDING "YES!"

Rumor: Apple to split stock

Saving Sound Volume Levels Across Reboots

I have a weird problem with a desktop where the volume settings for PCM, Microphone etc are all set to mute when I restart the machine. I then have to use the alsamixer command line tool to set the volumes to desired levels. This annoyed the hell out of me.

Finally I found a solution to this problem. So, if your computer has a volume memory problem, the following might be useful.

To set the volume and other sound settings to your desired level and save the settings, do the following:

  1. Delete the /etc/asound.conf file if it exists - Read Daniel’s Comment Below
  2. Use the alsamixer command to set the various volume levels etc
  3. Save the settings by using the command: $sudo alsactl store

And that is it!

Another tip I read on lifehacker: This works to suppress the volume when you boot up a laptop in a place where it is not supposed to annoy others — think library, seminar, conference…. Take an old, non-usable headphone, and snip off the wire just above the jack that plugs in to the speaker output of the computer. Plug this into your laptop before you boot up to prevent annoying people with the startup sounds as the computer boots up! It is a simple solution to a serious problem.

Material Shows Weakening of Climate Reports - New York Times

More evidence that the Bush Administration deliberately edited government climate reports to obscure evidence of the human role in global warming.

Foreign Policy: We Got Tubed—Again

What once appeared the exception now seems the rule. Officials in U.S. President George W. Bush’s administration are gingerly walking back from claims that North Korea was secretly building a factory to enrich uranium for dozens of atomic bombs. The intelligence, officials now say, was not as solid as they originally trumpeted. It does not seem that the North Korean program is as large or as advanced as claimed or that the country’s leaders are as set on building weapons as officials depicted. If this sounds familiar, it should. The original claims came during the same period officials were hyping stories of Iraq’s weapons. Once again, the claims involve aluminum tubes. Once again, there was cherry-picking and exaggeration of intelligence. Once again, the policy shaped the intelligence, with enormous national security costs.

March 19, 2007

White House Seeking Gonzales Replacements - Politico.com

White House Seeking Gonzales Replacements March 19, 2007 06:31 PM EST Republican officials operating at the behest of the White House have begun seeking a possible successor to Attorney General Alberto Gonzales, whose support among GOP lawmakers on Capitol Hill has collapsed, according to party sources familiar with the discussions. Among the names floated Monday by administration officials are Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff and White House anti-terrorism coordinator Frances Townsend. Former Deputy Attorney General Larry Thompson is a White House prospect. So is former solicitor general Theodore B. Olson, but sources were unsure whether he would want the job. Republican sources also disclosed that it is now a virtual certainty that Deputy Attorney General Paul J. McNulty, whose incomplete and inaccurate congressional testimony about the prosecutors helped precipitate the crisis, will also resign shortly. Officials were debating whether Gonzales and McNulty should depart at the same time or whether McNulty should go a day or two after Gonzales. Still known as "The Judge" for his service on the Texas Supreme Court, Gonzales is one of the few remaining original Texans who came to Washington with President Bush

Hello, Reblog

DJ.Riceweevil is rebuilding. Here are some of my open tabs from today. Kate Lyons is thinking about Second Life: "When I log in [to Second Life], it feels like I'm back in 1986, at my Apple IIe, with a super-slow dial-up modem connected to CompuServe.... For special libraries that unite users by interest, I think the value of SL is clear. Comic book archives, LGBT archives-- I think you should be on SL now (or maybe last month)." The Sarlacc Pit is alive and well. I didn't realize this was in doubt. This reminds me of the tourism industry in Tunisia, where Star Wars fans can spend the night in the Tusken Raider village. Seth and Amy ask Michael Vick: Really!?! The funniest SNL skit no one seems to talk about. What's up with Blackbeltjones/work? Hey Matt, Need a hand?

March 18, 2007

Hello, Reblog

DJ.Riceweevil is rebuilding. Here are some of my open tabs from today. Kate Lyons is thinking about Second Life: "When I log in [to Second Life], it feels like I'm back in 1986, at my Apple IIe, with a super-slow dial-up modem connected to CompuServe.... For special libraries that unite users by interest, I think the value of SL is clear. Comic book archives, LGBT archives-- I think you should be on SL now (or maybe last month)." The Sarlacc Pit is alive and well. I didn't realize this was in doubt. This reminds me of the tourism industry in Tunisia, where Star Wars fans can spend the night in the Tusken Raider village. Seth and Amy ask Michael Vick: Really!?! The funniest SNL skit no one seems to talk about. What's up with Blackbeltjones/work? Hey Matt, Need a hand?

The Raw Story | White House official: No probe launched into Plame leak

In testimony given today before the house oversight committee, James Knodell, Director of the Office of Security at the White House, revealed that the the administration had never launched an internal probe to determine the source for the outing of covert CIA operative Valerie Plame in 2003. In addition to revealing a deep reluctance on the part of the administration in determining the party responsible for the leak, Knodell's testimony directly contradicted a prior statement from President Bush promising a full internal probe. Ms. Plame Wilson, who in testimony earlier today confirmed her status at the time of the scandal as a covert CIA official and struck down assertions that she designed her husband's 2002 mission to Niger, told the committee, "My name and identity were carelessly and recklessly abused by senior officials in the White House and State Department. I could no longer perform the work for which I had been highly trained." Asked about an obligation of federal officials to report on any knowledge of a leak to a security officer, Knodell confirmed the requirement and admitted that not a single member of the administration had come to speak to him. Committee chair Henry Waxman, who in his opening statement described the the panel's duty to "determine what went wrong and insist on accountability," was taken aback by the implications of Knodell's testimony, describing it as "a breach within a breach."

The Raw Story | White House official: No probe launched into Plame leak

In testimony given today before the house oversight committee, James Knodell, Director of the Office of Security at the White House, revealed that the the administration had never launched an internal probe to determine the source for the outing of covert CIA operative Valerie Plame in 2003. In addition to revealing a deep reluctance on the part of the administration in determining the party responsible for the leak, Knodell's testimony directly contradicted a prior statement from President Bush promising a full internal probe. Ms. Plame Wilson, who in testimony earlier today confirmed her status at the time of the scandal as a covert CIA official and struck down assertions that she designed her husband's 2002 mission to Niger, told the committee, "My name and identity were carelessly and recklessly abused by senior officials in the White House and State Department. I could no longer perform the work for which I had been highly trained." Asked about an obligation of federal officials to report on any knowledge of a leak to a security officer, Knodell confirmed the requirement and admitted that not a single member of the administration had come to speak to him. Committee chair Henry Waxman, who in his opening statement described the the panel's duty to "determine what went wrong and insist on accountability," was taken aback by the implications of Knodell's testimony, describing it as "a breach within a breach."

Daily Kos: Rove's "Dirty Tricks" Email Servers

Imagine an administration that designed a special way to communicate to keep their secrets secret from investigations and history. Ok, stop imagining, because it's already here!! On the talking points website, we find an email with J. Scott Jennings Signature --a signature is the electronic equivalent to his business card. And it says

Daily Kos: Rove's "Dirty Tricks" Email Servers

Imagine an administration that designed a special way to communicate to keep their secrets secret from investigations and history. Ok, stop imagining, because it's already here!! On the talking points website, we find an email with J. Scott Jennings Signature --a signature is the electronic equivalent to his business card. And it says

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